REVIEW: Sennheiser GSP 350

Sennheiser GSP 350 Gaming Headset

Headquartered in Wedemark (just outside of Hannover) Germany, Sennheiser produces some of the top quality headphones to ever grace this planet. Last year, they received five (5) nominations for Outstanding Technical Achievement at the 33rd annual NAMM Technical Excellence and Creativity Awards. I’m actually quite excited, as this is the first headset from Sennheiser that I’ve done a product review on.

Features

Audio: The audio frequency range of the GSP 350 is an impressive 15 Hz on the bass end to 26,000 Hz on the high end. While anything less than 20 Hz on the bass end cannot be hear – it can be felt. What this creates is a 3D sound effect where the user is immersed within the audio, be it a video game with tank shells crashing and firing around you, or in the midst of a marching band with drums all around you. On the high-end, anything above 20,000 Hz cannot be heard, but it’s up for debate if frequencies above the 20,000 Hz range actually enhance the higher sound frequencies, even though you cannot hear them. Regardless, any headset or set of headphones that goes beyond the range of human hearing deserves respect.

Sennheiser GSP 350 Connection Cables

Connections: The Sennheiser GSP 350 comes with a surround sound dongle, which uses a micro-USB connector to USB connector – this USB then plugs into your PC. The other end of the dongle has a 3.5mm plug which plugs directly into the left ear cup on the headphones. So that said, WHAT was Sennheiser thinking with this? I’m really confused on the R&D here with this device – By not shipping with a 3.5mm adapter, they limit their audience. When I first saw the 3.5mm plug, I actually thought that was the plug for use in gaming systems and smartphones, but they in turn use the 3.5mm plug to connect to the ear cup itself – weird. Why not use the micro-USB to connect to the headset and then use the 3.5mm to connect to the audio device? Or better yet, ship an extra cable, like in the Steelseries Arctis 5, so the surround sound dongle can allow the user to choose what to connect to – a 3.5mm for gaming/smartphones, or a USB for PC’s? This set-up seems backwards and has left me wondering what Sennheiser is doing. At the end of the day, if you need/want the 3.5mm cable connector, it’s a special order from Sennheiser.

Microphone: The microphone on the GSP 350 is a noise cancelling mic, where it filters out background noises. Sennheiser has branded this a “broadcast quality” microphone, but I really don’t think it comes across like a “professional” mic. It’s still a great quality microphone which picks up frequencies within the range of 10 – 15,000 Hz. That’s pretty decent for a microphone. One thing that Sennheiser did with this mic is they created an auto-mute feature when the microphone is flipped up out of the way. That’s pretty ingenious if you ask me and honestly, I don’t know why other companies don’t do the same. Others will use a mute button on the ear cup, but as you know, any additional electronics such as buttons, dials, and switches are something that can break (and will break) so by having an auto-mute when it’s flipped up out of the way – that’s impressive. Another feature of the microphone is that it’s a noise cancelling microphone, so it reduces ambient background noise. For more information and understanding on how the noise cancelling feature works, check out my post titled Noise Reduction Headphones – How They Work. Unfortunately, just like its competitors, these headphones and their noise cancelling microphones tend to leave the user talking softly online. That said, it’s definitely not the same caliber as a professional microphone for video recording, but it’ll allow you to do “OK” quality YouTube videos.

Cushions: The cushions on the GSP 350 are an oval shape and use soft, pliable memory foam, which is covered with a leatherette material. Because of the softness of the memory foam, they fit your head and ears nicely, however I wonder about the durability. Whenever I’ve had headphones with extremely soft memory foam, they tend to tear and wear quickly. As a comparison, the Razer Kraken uses firmer memory foam and is covered with a similar leatherette material and these have held up “like new” for going on two years now.

Headband & Adjuster: A lot of users feel that the headband on the GSP 350 is designed based on aviation headsets, but if you know anything about Sennheiser, the design is the same as that of their broadcast or professional series headsets by having a split design with memory foam padding.

Sennheiser GSP 350 Split Headband

Everything I’ve been able to research on the Sennheiser GSP 350 indicates that the headband frame is made entirely of plastic, rather than an aluminum frame with a plastic overlay. Initially I thought the unit had an aluminum frame due to its flexibility, but rather I think it gets its flexibility from being a split band.

Volume Control on Right Ear Cup of the Sennheiser GSP 350

Lastly, the GSP 350 has a very unique feature unto itself. While the left ear cup holds the microphone, the right ear cup has an outer volume dial. This dial is substantial in size, so you don’t end up fumbling looking for this ¼” volume adjuster in dim lighting. This makes it super easy to adjust the volume on the unit.

Color: The Sennheiser GSP 350, which replaces the older GSP 300 in a black and blue color scheme, comes with a new black and red scheme. Other than the red and black design, there’s no RGB lighting on the headset at all – not even when the microphone is muted (odd).

What I Like

What I like about the Sennheiser GSP 350 is that it’s a Sennheiser. Seriously, Sennheiser makes some of the best headphones in the industry and their audio drivers are top-notch. The audio produced from the headset is full spectrum and easily adjusted with the volume wheel on the right ear cup. I also like that the microphone folds up and auto-mutes. As mentioned earlier in this review, I don’t know why other manufacturers haven’t thought of this.

What I Don’t Like

Unfortunately, this unit ended up being more of a letdown as there was just too many things I didn’t like. The connectors are the biggest downfall here as it limits the usability of the headset. What’s worse is Sennheiser expects you to buy adapter cables at the $20USD mark – this is of course, after you just forked out all your cash for the unit. Due to the Sennheiser brand name, I thought these would have been constructed from the best products in the industry. Soft (weak) ear cushions and memory foam is a bad thing. I honestly don’t think these will last long and a quick Google search shows a LOT of comments from users experiencing tears with these. I’m not a fan of overly-plastic headphones or headsets. While the headset itself is flexible, I was unable to determine (without breaking them) if the headband frame was made from metal and covered in plastic. Nowhere does it state this on the Sennheiser site either. I’d hazard a guess these are fully plastic and likely won’t stand up to taking the units on/off with 1 hand repeatedly.

Verdict – Would I Buy It Again?

For me, having no RGB lighting is not a deal breaker as I could care less about not having that feature. Besides, when I have the headset on, I can’t see the lighting, so who cares? Unfortunately I feel let down by Sennheiser on these with the cheap product quality and lack of cable connectors. As this unit pushes the price tag over its competition, you would think it would come packed with features and scream of quality workmanship – this unit had neither. As such, I would not buy these again.

Detailed Product Information

Product: Sennheiser GSP 350 PC Gaming Headset with Dolby 7.1 Surround Sound
Price: $139.95
Cheapest place to buy: Amazon
Warranty: 2 Years
My Rating: 5 out of 10

19 thoughts on “REVIEW: Sennheiser GSP 350

  • July 4, 2018 at 2:37 pm
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    Hi Dave, thank you for a well written and honest review of Sennheiser GSP 350.

    I am thinking of buying a good quality headset and while searching on the internet I came across your site to read the review.

    Your review has outlined some design faults in the headset that I would not expect from Sennheiser products as I have heard so many good things about them.

    Dave, clearly you would not buy this product again so my question is what would you recommend to someone like me who wants a good quality headset with a budget of around $150 maximum?

    Reply
    • July 4, 2018 at 6:20 pm
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      Moni, I’m a firm believer that when buying a headset (or anything really), get a budget that you can afford and stick to it – then look to get the product that has the most features that you’re looking for in that price range. I honestly feel that in the $150 or less range, the best headsets on the market would be the Razer Kraken series or the SteelSeries Arctis 5.

      Reply
  • July 4, 2018 at 2:46 pm
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    That’s a great review. Very informative. – the pictures are well placed and the descriptions of the product are detailed. I love sennheiser gear too, and I would think twice about purchasing a gaming headset like this one.

    Reply
  • July 4, 2018 at 3:07 pm
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    I have wanted a pair of Sennheiser headphones for a long time. I think your review has given me the research necessary to convince my wife it is time I take the plunge. I know these tend to be on the high end as far as price goes, but they are well worth it.

    I want to be able to not only hear the bass but feel it. So will this pair of headphones be good for watching movies, etc? My son will probably use them to play Overwatch and Fortnite.

    I really like the controls on the right side, and I love the split headband that is foam padded. I am convinced I need to buy these, now it’s up to my wife 🙂

    Reply
    • July 4, 2018 at 6:10 pm
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      Steve, I had to laugh when I read your comment about your son playing Fortnite with them. My son is doing the exact same thing right now, but he’s broken 2 pair (well, the dogs did, but he was playing with them), so now he needs to save up his chore money to buy his next pair.

      Reply
  • July 4, 2018 at 5:08 pm
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    Thank you for sharing your evaluation. I am thinking of buying headphones and I love my old Sennheiser ones; however, I will not buy this model.

    Reply
    • July 4, 2018 at 6:11 pm
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      Hey Sandra, I feel the same way and really let down by Sennheiser with these lower-end models. I’d suggest looking at some of their higher end products, but then you really start digging deep into your wallet.

      Reply
  • July 4, 2018 at 5:32 pm
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    Dope cans Dave, thanks for sharing. That cushioning set up looks to die for. How much does this headset cost? Im looking at upgrading my current set up and these might be the ones if the price is right

    Reply
    • July 4, 2018 at 6:15 pm
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      These retail off the Sennheiser site for $200 (free shipping), but you can get them off Amazon for around $140 (using Amazon Prime).

      Reply
  • July 4, 2018 at 5:49 pm
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    Great article! I plan on getting a new headset for a new expansion that is coming out in August and the comfort matters most to me. You say the headband for this one is made of plastic when the thought was aluminum.

    Does aluminum make a difference with comfort or just depends on the foam padding?

    Reply
    • July 4, 2018 at 6:16 pm
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      Hey Brandon, the aluminum or metal inner-frame would allow for more flexibility in the headset (for when you’re taking it on and off) and would provide more strength. By using a hard/semi-hard plastic to fully encase the headband, it becomes a breaking point. Many manufacturers are using a metal/aluminum inner-shell and then cover with a plastic.

      Reply
  • July 5, 2018 at 1:04 am
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    Sennheiser is a well-renowned company and when it comes to audio equipment right up there with the best. Unfortunately, to keep the costs down corners have to be cut which doesn’t help the brand. I have some Bang and Olufsen that I bought on the plane which just wraps around the ear and are great, especially for travelling, but recently I have been looking for some for use at home so I may check these out. Thanks for the information and one thing I couldn’t find was a link to purchase?

    Reply
  • July 5, 2018 at 2:52 am
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    Hi Dave.
    Thanks for your review of the Sennheiser GSP 350 headphones. I’m not an audio buff by any means and in the past I have gone for the cheapest there is but I’m starting to think that like everything, you get what you pay for. I can see that you are not too impressed with these headphones and the fact that you have to buy extra adaptors is annoying too. Thank you for being honest on the review here. I read that you like the Sennheiser brand but if you wanted to buy a good set of headphones that were in the mid-high range (but not $100s) what would you suggest and what would you expect to pay.

    Reply
    • July 5, 2018 at 7:55 am
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      Hi Gail, at this point, I’d recommend either the Razer Kraken or the SteelSeries Arctis 5’s. For the money, they’re the best constructed headphones on the market. The Razer goes even further with it’s range of audio frequency and top-notch memory foam (they really spared no expense).

      Reply
  • July 5, 2018 at 4:52 am
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    Hi Dave, that is some really good information that you have in your review. I can see where it would help people. Thanks for discussing this in some detail.

    After reading your review, I went over to Amazon and looked at the product rating stars and the customer reviews there. I was expecting more as I learned that the manufacturer had a number of third party rewards.

    Back to doing more research in my search for a good quality headset.

    Reply
    • July 5, 2018 at 7:58 am
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      Hi David, yes I was a bit disappointed in these, but both the Sennheiser GSP 300’s and 350’s are their ‘entry model’, so you have to keep that in mind. The problem for me, is at the same price point, their competitors are coming to the table with a much better product.

      Reply
  • July 5, 2018 at 5:21 am
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    This is the best article I have read so far on Sennheiser GSP 350 . It is very informative and well elaborated.
    And this has cleared all the doubts I had concerning Sennheiser GSP 350.
    Thanks Dave

    Reply
  • July 6, 2018 at 11:08 am
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    This is a great article Dave and really gave me a lot of information. Since you aren’t really recommending these earphones, what would you recommend for a 10 year old and his gaming. I have tried several different ones, and they either aren’t comfortable or seem to easily break. Thanks for the information.

    Reply
    • July 6, 2018 at 12:43 pm
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      Marla, we’ve been in the exact same boat with headphones with our son and he’s right around the same age bracket. The headphones that really hold up to kids are either the SteelSeries Arctis 5 or the Razer Kraken ones. I personally prefer the Razer Kraken’s due to the quality of construction (superior memory foam, leatherette ear covers, etc.) but I’d recommend them for someone 13+ as they tend to take better care of their headphones and don’t yank them off with 1 hand.

      Reply

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